Tag Archives: Republican

Obama’s European Vacation

The site of the planned Obama speech in Berlin is generating a significant amount of buzz in the German press. The Obama folks and their socialist admirers wanted the Brandenburg Gate, a controversial choice for both Americans and Germans. As a symbol of German unification, many natives wondered how Obama had helped tear down the wall; after all, he was still a law student at Harvard. And as the site of one of the most historic addresses ever by an American President, many devoted Reaganites felt the mere idea was tantamount to sacrilege.

The Brandenburg uproar forced Obama’s posse to settle on the Victory Column, yet another controversial choice. Deputy leader of the free Democrats argued (from der Spiegel)

“The Siegessäule in Berlin was moved to where it is now by Adolf Hitler. He saw it as a symbol of German superiority and of the victorious wars against Denmark, Austria and France,” the deputy told Bild am Sonntag. He raised the question as to “whether Barack Obama was advised correctly in his choice of the Siegessäule as the site to hold a speech on his vision for a more cooperative world.”

Historical ignorance aside, the most disturbing part of the speech, is the speech. When has an American Presidential candidate ever given a campaign address in a foreign country? But more importantly, when has a foreign presidential candidate ever addressed an American audience? I can’t think of one, which makes me wonder why Obama has thought it prudent to stand before a European audience to rally admirers, most of whom aren’t eligible to vote.

And memo to the American press who will cover this speech, and who continue to mischaracterize Obama’s European support as widespread and sweeping: Europeans aren’t monoliths. Just because you might have spent two months at a foreign bureau, presumably sharing croissants with American journalists, doesn’t qualify you to make a judgment about Obama’s messiah status in the old continent. Just because Germans are disturbingly obsessed with Obama, doesn’t automatically correlate to an Italian fervor over a McCain defeat. There are many plausible explanations for the German-Obama swoon:

  1. Perhaps as the most racist European country, Germans are suffering from ‘white guilt’
  2. They hated Bush more than other Europeans, so they view an Obama victory as a Bush rebuke.
  3. They heard rumors that Obama likes wienerschnitzel.
  4. The largest portion of Obama admirers are former East German communists and recognize a fellow comrade when they see one.
  5. They fell in love with Michelle Obama after she admitted to not previously being ‘proud of America’.

Obama’s Secret Weapons

Tiger Woods dons a red shirt on tournament Sundays. Michael Jordan never forgot to put on his North Carolina Tarheel shorts underneath his Bulls uniform. The long-standing relationship between athletes and their superstitions, good-luck charms and pre-game rituals is considered largely innocuous by sports fans, rather a side-note to the victories and defeats. Sure they might get a mention during a half-time feature, but for the most part, their pre-match voodoo goes unnoticed and unreported.

We might not care if our athletes or next door neighbors are superstitious, but our Commander-in-Chief, the nuclear passé-partout daddy, carrying around lucky stones, golden monkeys and little eagles for luck?

Are American voters aware that the “yes we can” candidate, is so unsure that he can, he is jiggling some stones in his pocket hoping that he will?

Two Year Itch…Four Year Nightmare

The return of conservatives to power in Italy was inevitable. Immigration, high unemployment and a stalling economy have mercifully ended their two-year flirtation with the Italian left. Really, the only reason Prodi and the other “former” communists were able to take over and last two years was Berlusconi’s inability to follow through with promised reforms during his second stint as Prime Minister. The popular war in Iraq didn’t help either.

By giving a whopping nine point victory and an unmistakable mandate, the Italian people also issued an unmistakable warning to any American who dares to believe that a liberal Democrat can solve what ails America’s economy. Out-going PM Prodi never brought the much needed economic reforms to Italy. He couldn’t. Because what Italy needed was antithetical to his (and most liberals) core beliefs. Stripping power from unions and reforming entitlements weren’t exactly enticing undertakings for a “former” communist.

As I warn in The Absentee Ballot, America’s struggles can only worsen with a liberal captaining the ship. And to those leftists who point to the struggling U.S. economy: the last seven years cannot be blamed on conservatism, because conservatism didn’t fail. George Bush failed conservatism. It was the largest expansion of federal government since LBJ along with irresponsible spending, that have sent the economy and the greenback falling—not conservative governance.

For America’s sake, I just hope it doesn’t take a four-year flirtation with Senator Obama.

Rush Limbaugh Wins Texas and Ohio

Turning around Obama’s catchy, yet irritating “Yes we can,” Senator Clinton’s Ohio supporters chanted “Yes we will,” as she celebrated her big Ohio win.  But the phrase of the evening should be, “Yes he did.” More specifically, Rush Limbaugh.

By encouraging his listeners to cross over in the open Texas primaries and vote for Hillary, Rush just might have saved Hill’s political career, in addition to salvaging Republican hopes to retain the White House. According to early exit polls, ten percent of the Democratic Primary voters in both Texas and Ohio were Republicans.

By late Tuesday, Obama’s five-percentage point lead from early voting had evaporated. Although it’s anyone’s guess as to who will emerge the electoral victor in Texas, Hillary looks like she’ll take the popular vote.

But make no mistake, the real winner of Tuesday was one radio host in Palm Beach.

 

Enquirer to Some, Bible to Most

mccain.jpgThe latest New York Times hit piece, this time targeting Senator John McCain, doesn’t come as a shock to most Republicans who rightly view the Old Grey Lady as a radical leftist rag that has suffered numerous credibility blows in recent years. From their reporter, Jason Blair, who made up stories and interviews to the damning UCLA study that found the paper to be biased, numerous scandals have sullied its already damaged reputation.  But most Americans don’t consider how its bogus smears and biased reportage shape opinion in the rest of the world, where people view The New York Times as the American news authority.  

Take this McCain excerpt from France’s Le Figaro:

Vicki Iseman is accused by The New York Times to have “bought” the votes of some of its customers in telecommunications eight years ago. When McCain was a candidate in the first presidential election, the Vietnam veteran was married with three children and chaired the Committee on the Senate. According to The New York Times, the customers Vicki Iseman gave several thousand dollars to fund the campaigns of McCain.

  From Italy’s Corriere della Sera : 

Senator John McCain of Arizona, favored to become the Republican candidate to the White House, collects a blow from the most prestigious newspaper in the States, the New York Times. He had a sentimental relationship with a lobbyist nine years ago at the dawn of the first race of McCain at the White House. Revelations that might cast discredit on this second, and more successful, McCain presidential campaign based on ethics and fairness.

The most alarming statement of the two articles is the assertion made by Italy’s Corriere which called The New York Times “the most prestigious newspaper in the states.” You might wonder who really cares and why it should matter. Well, when Republicans are muddied and their policies villified by editors and reporters at the Times, don’t for one second believe that it doesn’t influence how conservatives and American policies are perceived globally.

The Quality of Color

obama2.jpg

Oofah!

“In the Obama candidacy, there is a potentially history-making quality that we should reflect on. It is one that is especially relevant on the sensitive topic of race — because South Carolina and the South as a whole bear a heavier historical burden than the rest of our country on that front”

 Even more amazing than the quote is the party affiliation of the author. The Republican Governor of South Carolina penned the rather embarrassing op-ed in The State, South Carolina’s largest newspaper.  Not only did Gov. Sanford insult South Carolinians by reminding them of their shameful past with respect to racism, but if you read between the lines, he’s saying an Obama vote is a vehicle for atonement. Kind of sad, really.  He goes on…. 

“Nonetheless, what is happening in the initial success of his candidacy should not escape us. Within many of our own lifetimes, a man who looked like Barack Obama had a difficult time even using the public restrooms in our state.”

 Maybe the premise of Shelby Steele’s book White Guilt is accurate. And maybe those who suggest that the discrepancy between the Iowa caucus vote and the New Hampshire primary vote have a point. Perhaps those white Iowans didn’t want to look un-hip, un-cool and even slightly racist. Nobody wanted to be the guy with his hands down when the Obama roll call came.  

Apparently, the most important qualification Senator Obama has is his color. And silly me, I thought we were past this.

Huckabee, the Presidency and the Pope

I haven’t met an actual Huck-backer since he began skyrocketing in the polls and shaking up the pundits’ election score-card. I just don’t get the fascination with him. Sure, he’s shown many positions, but are those positions really in line with the GOP? He’s a prolific pardoner, he’s disinterested in closing the borders, and I’ve learned that he not only can lead the congregation in sermons, but also in song. Only, instead of “Old Rugged Cross”, it’s more like “Kumbaya” and “Kyrie.”

So what is the reason for his surprising frontrunner status in Iowa and South Carolina? I gather it’s his ministerial background as opposed to his gubernatorial one. Apparently, Republicans are electing a Pope, not a President.

But how would some of the world’s greatest leaders have fared under this relatively new, yet narrow criterion? Carter vs Reagan in 1980. I have no doubt: if the more dedicated Christian had won, we would have missed out on perhaps the most prosperous decade of the 20th Century, not to mention one of its best Presidents. What about a sinner like Sarkozy who dared to divorce his first wife, and, gasp, is in the middle of his second separation? Would he be elected in the U.S.?

I don’t know, the preoccupation with faith in politics has me bewildered and depressed. In this election cycle at least, the candidates’ dedication to Christianity appears essential to their viability.

Maybe it’s not too late to persuade one of my parents to run; after all, they’re both Southern Baptist Sunday school teachers.