Tag Archives: Elections

Obama: a Plant?


A friend forwarded me an e-mail detailing the possibility that Obama could be a plant, by going back through his past and examining various inconsistencies and troubling questions which have gone unanswered. Perhaps many of you have received these viral e-mails, like the one claiming Obama is a Muslim.

Come on. Conservatives need to stop investigating Obama, start looking at the polls and wake up. However entertaining, none of these viral e-mails addresses the real problem: the poll respondents who have him in the lead. Therein lies the problem.

Americans don’t care that Obama is a socialist; why should they care who planted him? Just this weekend, while greeting voters, Obama was confronted by a plumber who said, ‘you’re going to raise my taxes, aren’t you,’ to which Obama replied, ‘I just want to spread it around.’ That’s codespeak for socialism, Marxism and all the other redistribution ideologies that have failed over the last century or so.

The bottom line is this: Americans are ignorant and ill-informed. They believe Obama will be powerless to harm the country or their bank accounts, even though he will have both houses of Congress in his pocket to enact any tax increase he wishes.

Voters will get exactly what they deserve when they elect an anti-American socialist on November 4. Despite the complete and utter failure of the Bush administration, the polls shouldn’t be close. Voters should look at the impressive characters supporting Obama (Chavez, Castro and Ahmadinejad), at his background and philosophies, his past as a street thug intimidating banks to make loans to people who couldn’t afford them and his involvement with Acorn, Ayers and Rezko. And most importantly, they should examine his ideology.

That this election is close is a testament one of two realities: the stupidity of Americans, or their sudden embrace of Marx and wealth redistribution. Neither of the two conclusions is comforting.

In response to the financial crisis of last week, Russia’s communist newspaper Pravda headlined with ‘The triumphant return to the teachings of Marx and Engels.’  Perhaps on November 5, we’ll be staring at a similar headline in The New York Times.

The Global Scelto: Barack Obama

Like I explain in my book, The Absentee Ballot, recognizing traits unique to the United States and Americans became easier after I had been abroad for a while. I didn’t notice our idiosyncrasies because they bombarded me daily.

One of the most glaring American deficiencies is our obsession with acceptance. We are consumed by wearing the latest trend, living in the most beautiful house and driving the best car. I was reminded yesterday when I parked outside of a golf shop and sat in the car while my husband went inside. I watched a man exit the store and open the car door of a late model black Mercedes, with shiny rims and windows with a gangster tint, sitting in the spot adjacent mine. His hair was perfectly coiffed, his clothes spiffy and a diamond encrusted Rolex sparkled on his wrist. My mind then drifted to a Milanese Rolex dealer who once told me that Rolex only makes the diamond face for the American market; Europeans would never wear them. Sure, they might buy a watch costing five-hundred thousand Euros, but it wouldn’t contain diamonds and no one would ever know.

This story does have a point, apart from materialism. The diamonds we wear, the Guccis we carry, and the BMWs we drive aren’t for our benefit. They are for the benefit of the guy at work and everyone else we come in contact with. Like this psychological need to impress, we have become unhinged in our recent desire to re-curry favor in the international community. It’s like there are three hundred million Sally Fields standing on the world stage demanding “like me, really really like me.”

Barack Obama isn’t just the first black American to receive a major party nomination; apparently he’s the only one who can make the world like us again. A Washington Post article starts out by pointing to our tattered reputation abroad. It goes on to explore the global reaction of Obama’s nomination.

From India: Sunila Patel “A black president of the U.S. will mean that there will be more American tolerance for people around the world who are different.”

It’s nice that Ms Patel is concerned about our racial tolerance, but maybe she should worry about the fissures within her own community. Just how tolerant are the Hindus toward the Muslims and vice-versa. And how evolved is a society based on a caste system and one in which males having more value than females.

From Britain. “Obama is the exciting image of what we always hoped America was,” said Robin Niblett, director of Chatham House, a British foreign policy institute.

What were you hoping America was? Tolerant? Racially diverse? Multicultural? Compassionate? One question. Who was the last black, or nominee of Indian or Pakistani descent to become Prime Minister of Britain? Maybe I missed him or her in my history books. Perhaps Mr. Niblett is simply excited at the possibility of having a fellow socialist in the Oval Office.

From Germany: Obama also has strong support in Europe, the heartland of anti-Bush sentiment. “Germany is Obama country,” said Karsten Voight, the German government’s coordinator for German-North American cooperation. “He seems to strike a chord with average Germans.”

Which average Germans would those be? Is she referring to “evolved” citizens like herself who work in think tanks and universities, or the ones desecrating Jewish graves and inciting racial violence throughout the Fatherland?

I voted twice for Bush, and he has proven worthy of a spot in a ‘who is the worst President in the last hundred years?’ debate. The dollar is a shadow of its former self, healthcare costs have skyrocketed, gas prices have ballooned, relations with our allies have suffered, wages have stagnated, and our federal budget has expanded to unprecedented levels. And for all of the Bush apologists who point to an increase in security, try traveling internationally. While machine gun toting and profiling Italian police roam Malpensa airport in Milan, our security asks us to take off our shoes. I’ve smuggled cheese each and every trip and until they catch my cheese, I won’t admit that the country is safer.

Bush’s poor performance aside, when did a President become a reason to celebrate or despise a country? Do we hate Venezuelans because of Chavez? Are Iranians evil because of Ahmadinejad?

It is too simplistic to characterize a nation based on the election of its President. It is also unhealthy for Americans to elect a President based on a desire to be liked.

Two Year Itch…Four Year Nightmare

The return of conservatives to power in Italy was inevitable. Immigration, high unemployment and a stalling economy have mercifully ended their two-year flirtation with the Italian left. Really, the only reason Prodi and the other “former” communists were able to take over and last two years was Berlusconi’s inability to follow through with promised reforms during his second stint as Prime Minister. The popular war in Iraq didn’t help either.

By giving a whopping nine point victory and an unmistakable mandate, the Italian people also issued an unmistakable warning to any American who dares to believe that a liberal Democrat can solve what ails America’s economy. Out-going PM Prodi never brought the much needed economic reforms to Italy. He couldn’t. Because what Italy needed was antithetical to his (and most liberals) core beliefs. Stripping power from unions and reforming entitlements weren’t exactly enticing undertakings for a “former” communist.

As I warn in The Absentee Ballot, America’s struggles can only worsen with a liberal captaining the ship. And to those leftists who point to the struggling U.S. economy: the last seven years cannot be blamed on conservatism, because conservatism didn’t fail. George Bush failed conservatism. It was the largest expansion of federal government since LBJ along with irresponsible spending, that have sent the economy and the greenback falling—not conservative governance.

For America’s sake, I just hope it doesn’t take a four-year flirtation with Senator Obama.

Are Republicans after the Anti-Bush?

John McCain Hangry

Lost in the analysis of the ever-changing complexion of the Republican primary—more specifically the ascension of John McCain—is why conservatives seem to be bucking conventional wisdom by gravitating toward someone who hasn’t simply bucked party principles but has been the party maverick, the one most likely to appear first under results of a ‘Republican outcast’ Google search.    

Some pundits cite a less than stellar field as a rationale for McCain’s popularity, and perhaps they’re right. Others believe it’s his electability, in so much as he might be the only one that can knock off Hillary Clinton. But there is one motivation for the McCain surge not making the editorial roundtables—Bush fatigue. Usually mentioned in connection with Democratic frustration and voter turnout, it’s rarely mentioned as an explanation for McCain’s emergence.

Republicans haven’t forgotten McCain-Feingold or his roguish ‘gang of 14’. They also don’t share his view on immigration. From Zogby:

“An overwhelming majority of American adults say a candidate’s stance on immigration is important to their voting decisions, a new Zogby Interactive poll shows. More than 76 % of the online poll respondents said a candidate’s position on immigration is a “very important” or “somewhat important” factor in their decision on who to vote for in the presidential elections of 2008”

So obviously, many Republicans are ignoring recent history with regards to McCain, his amnesty proposal and his forever needling of conservatives. Maybe they too want change and are looking for the anti-Bush.

Who better than that Republican who has been most openly critical?

Everything is Relative

zio_paperone.gif

From Michigan to Florida, voters are anxious about the direction of the U.S. economy and how the downturn will affect their pocketbook. Their anxiety is understandable, but a proper perspective might dampen their increasing negativity.

 From today’s Italian newspaper (with the help of Google translator), Il Corriere Della Sera According to ISTAT, 14.6% of Italian families (one in seven) say they have a hard time at the end of the month to pay their bills. One out of ten have difficulty with the most essential expenses: bills, heating, and medical treatment, while 4.2% of families in Corsica had problems, at least once, to stock their refrigerator. The Istat survey was in 2006.” 

Americans face tough times, but in looking around the world, even in Western Europe, they still sit top the figurative list of world’s luckiest populations.

Huckabee, the Presidency and the Pope

I haven’t met an actual Huck-backer since he began skyrocketing in the polls and shaking up the pundits’ election score-card. I just don’t get the fascination with him. Sure, he’s shown many positions, but are those positions really in line with the GOP? He’s a prolific pardoner, he’s disinterested in closing the borders, and I’ve learned that he not only can lead the congregation in sermons, but also in song. Only, instead of “Old Rugged Cross”, it’s more like “Kumbaya” and “Kyrie.”

So what is the reason for his surprising frontrunner status in Iowa and South Carolina? I gather it’s his ministerial background as opposed to his gubernatorial one. Apparently, Republicans are electing a Pope, not a President.

But how would some of the world’s greatest leaders have fared under this relatively new, yet narrow criterion? Carter vs Reagan in 1980. I have no doubt: if the more dedicated Christian had won, we would have missed out on perhaps the most prosperous decade of the 20th Century, not to mention one of its best Presidents. What about a sinner like Sarkozy who dared to divorce his first wife, and, gasp, is in the middle of his second separation? Would he be elected in the U.S.?

I don’t know, the preoccupation with faith in politics has me bewildered and depressed. In this election cycle at least, the candidates’ dedication to Christianity appears essential to their viability.

Maybe it’s not too late to persuade one of my parents to run; after all, they’re both Southern Baptist Sunday school teachers.

long-banner-wp3.jpg