Enquirer to Some, Bible to Most

mccain.jpgThe latest New York Times hit piece, this time targeting Senator John McCain, doesn’t come as a shock to most Republicans who rightly view the Old Grey Lady as a radical leftist rag that has suffered numerous credibility blows in recent years. From their reporter, Jason Blair, who made up stories and interviews to the damning UCLA study that found the paper to be biased, numerous scandals have sullied its already damaged reputation.  But most Americans don’t consider how its bogus smears and biased reportage shape opinion in the rest of the world, where people view The New York Times as the American news authority.  

Take this McCain excerpt from France’s Le Figaro:

Vicki Iseman is accused by The New York Times to have “bought” the votes of some of its customers in telecommunications eight years ago. When McCain was a candidate in the first presidential election, the Vietnam veteran was married with three children and chaired the Committee on the Senate. According to The New York Times, the customers Vicki Iseman gave several thousand dollars to fund the campaigns of McCain.

  From Italy’s Corriere della Sera : 

Senator John McCain of Arizona, favored to become the Republican candidate to the White House, collects a blow from the most prestigious newspaper in the States, the New York Times. He had a sentimental relationship with a lobbyist nine years ago at the dawn of the first race of McCain at the White House. Revelations that might cast discredit on this second, and more successful, McCain presidential campaign based on ethics and fairness.

The most alarming statement of the two articles is the assertion made by Italy’s Corriere which called The New York Times “the most prestigious newspaper in the states.” You might wonder who really cares and why it should matter. Well, when Republicans are muddied and their policies villified by editors and reporters at the Times, don’t for one second believe that it doesn’t influence how conservatives and American policies are perceived globally.

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